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Solar Panel Maintenance – Easy Care for Solar Panels

maintenance of solar panelsOwning a home comes with a lot of responsibilities, including maintaining your lawn, keeping your home clean, and staying on top of annoying little home repairs. But your solar energy system is one aspect of home ownership that doesn’t require a lot of work and maintenance.

Here’s what you have to do to help your solar panels perform at peak efficiency.

1. Dust the solar panels about once every three months or so.

You may have to go on your roof with a squeegee, water and mild detergent to dust off the panels. Depending on the pitch and height of your roof, you may be able to clean them with a long mop and squeegee and your garden hose. (If you live in a dry, dusty climate, you may have to do this more often.)

2. Clear snow off your roof in the winter.

After snow, you’ll want to go out and use an extended mop (or go on your roof with your car’s ice scraper) to brush the snow off your solar panels to keep them operating. This may add five or 10 minutes to your snow shoveling efforts. The snow on your solar panels melts more quickly than other snow, so following a light snowfall, you may not have to do anything but wait an hour or so for the snow to slide right off the panels, when they’ll begin working again.

3. Trim back trees that are starting to create shadows on the solar panels, blocking their operation.

Do this once a year as part of your spring yard work routine and you won’t have to worry about it for most of the year.

Also keep an eye on your solar panels (glance up before you leave the house in the morning) to make sure nothing is obstructing their operation, like overgrown trees, leaves, or bird droppings. If only everything else in your home (and life) was this easy to maintain!

Post Written by
A full-time freelance writer, Dawn frequently covers energy efficiency, green living, and topics like LED lighting and whole home control systems for a number of blogs and technology trade magazines. Dawn is proud to live in New York as the state vies to beat out New Jersey as the East coast top dog of solar energy and is waiting for the Solar Renewable Energy Certificate legislation to pass before installing solar panels on her Long Island home.

5 Comments

  1. solar panel says:

    Thank you for the tips ,my solar panel can be more efficient like a new one.

  2. [...] Not that a solar PV array requires much maintenance or a lot to think about, but this type of virtual metering works especially well in places like apartment buildings, houses that are part of homeowners’ associations, or homes in heavily-shaded areas — three market segments that typically could not benefit from solar power for a variety of reasons. Virtual metering also works well for lower-income homeowners without the cash to pay for a solar array or the credit history to get any sort of financing in the form of a solar lease or a loan. [...]

  3. [...] Not that a solar PV array requires much maintenance or a lot to think about, but this type of virtual metering works especially well in places like apartment buildings, houses that are part of homeowners’ associations, or homes in heavily-shaded areas — three market segments that typically could not benefit from solar power for a variety of reasons. Virtual metering also works well for lower-income homeowners without the cash to pay for a solar array or the credit history to get any sort of financing in the form of a solar lease or a loan. [...]

  4. [...] Not that a solar PV array requires much maintenance or a lot to think about, but this type of virtual metering works especially well in places like apartment buildings, houses that are part of homeowners’ associations, or homes in heavily-shaded areas — three market segments that typically could not benefit from solar power for a variety of reasons. Virtual metering also works well for lower-income homeowners without the cash to pay for a solar array or the credit history to get any sort of financing in the form of a solar lease or a loan. [...]

  5. [...] Not that a solar PV array requires much maintenance or a lot to think about, but this type of virtual metering works especially well in places like apartment buildings, houses that are part of homeowners’ associations, or homes in heavily-shaded areas — three market segments that typically could not benefit from solar power for a variety of reasons. Virtual metering also works well for lower-income homeowners without the cash to pay for a solar array or the credit history to get any sort of financing in the form of a solar lease or a loan. [...]


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